Commentary

A Frontier Tort White Paper: Concussions in the NFL

Editor’s Note: While this blog is normally dedicated to analyzing legal issues in the field of sports and entertainment, this post departs from that to spotlight some excellent work done by 1Ls at Harvard Law School. At HLS in fall 2012, the eighty students in Section...

The Future of the NFL Faced by Concussion Lawsuits

Last month, the NFL Competition Committee passed another rule restricting the use of helmets as a point of contact during games.  The decision was met with a customary (read: excessive) amount of vitriol by fans and players.  Many fans seem to think that the NFL is...

Sports Symposium Investigates the Evolving Fan Experience

On March 28, the Harvard Law School Committee on Sports and Entertainment Law hosted its annual Sports Symposium.  Sports industry leaders gathered at Wasserstein Hall to discuss the various legal challenges presented by the ever-changing experience of sports fans. ...

First-Sale Doctrine in Digital Markets

Copyrights are different from other property rights: There is nothing intuitive or inalienable about them. They are not meant to retain all benefits for a single owner, but rather to act as temporary valves as the benefits of ownership flow from one to many, from the...

Will a Ticket’s Price Always Exceed its Worth?

Want to watch the Boston Celtics take on their playoff nemeses of the past two seasons, the red-hot Lebron James and the Miami Heat? No problem, except the cheapest seats in the house will cost you $85.  Brokers can buy tickets at face value before selling at a...

“Winning” the Hole in One

Ask anyone who has spent four hours on an immaculate green lawn, swinging a club wildly and chasing a small white ball from sandy ditch to wooded pines, and they will tell you: golf is a simultaneously blissful and frustrating sport. But few golfers have experienced...

Strong Case Against Armstrong?

On October 22nd, 2012, the Union Cycliste Internationale (UCI), the governing body for professional cycling and overseer of international competitive cycling events, banned Lance Armstrong from cycling, stripped him of his seven Tour de France titles and called on him...

Copyrights in Neverland

Once upon a time, there was a copyright that would not die. A short and shy Scottish writer, James Matthew Barrie, published a story about a boy who never grew up. In 1929, after publishing the script of the play Peter Pan, Barrie gave away its lucrative copyright to...